deep

It’s about 11:00 PM as I sit in front of the computer again, thinking…there is a very heavy rain outside, thunder, lightning, hard to say how long the power will last, since storms normally knock it out here. I have to stop to set up pots in the kitchen and living room to catch water. There is a mini-waterfall coming in the kitchen window. The dishes are just sitting in the sink for now, and will still be there in the morning. No sense bothering tonight. Lots of lightning could mean the power will go off at any time. Anything I wash and put in the drainer will just get dirty ceiling water on it, so it would be an exercise in futility to try to clean up tonight, or any time there is rain in the house. Coal dust fills the space above the ceiling, so when it rains the dirty water comes through the ceiling in many places, at least one window, and one wall. Sounds like a lovely place to live, doesn’t it? It could be worse.

I think online for now…

If (the deepest place known on earth) the Mariana Trench’s bottom lies 6.8 miles (11,000 m) below the sea’s surface — farther below sea level than Mount Everest is above sea level at 29,028 feet— and jets fly about 36,000 above sea level…we travel through quite a few atmospheres. Of course, space is much higher than the ocean is deep (at least what we know), starting at 62 miles high. I guess it will be a while before I can scrape up the 20 million or so needed to take a little space flight, courtesy of some billionaire with flights of fancy for the rich and famous. Maybe next week. 

 Up/down, air/water…

The deepest point ever reached by a manned probe was 35,810 feet by the U.S. Navy’s Trieste 1 in 1960, at a site about 25 miles away from the Challenger Deep in the Pacific’s Mariana Trench— the ocean’s deepest point. The Trieste 1 has since been decommissioned. Kaiko, a one-of-a-kind instrument, entered the record books in 1995 by diving 36,008 feet to the bottom of the Challenger Deep. There are actually fish that live that far beneath the surface of the water. But not dolphins.

Since references to dolphins keep showing up in cartoons, thus in my collages and anagrams, I decided to check out a couple of http’s on “dolphinese”. I found that researchers at Whale Research Centre at Southern Cross University in New South Wales, Australia,  have identified 186 different types of dolphin whistles, 20 of which are relatively common, including a flat-toned whistle made by dolphins as the rode the waves.

 The team suspect the noise is the dolphin equivalent of an over-excited child shouting “wheeee”. They have recorded 1,647 whistles from 51 different pods, or groups in New South Wales. I liked the “wheeee” part. Part of the collage I did earlier (a good example) has a “Wheee!!” in it. Just a coincidence. Back to dolphins…What do you think dolphins are trying to tell us if they “talk” to us?

 

 

” It is of interest to note that while some dolphins are reported to have learned English — up to fifty words used in correct context — no human being has been reported to have learned dolphinese.” (Carl Sagan)
As I said, I just did an anagram which made me think dolphins again. The anagram was done using 12 recent blog entry titles (something I do occasionally if you haven’t been reading). The titles used were:
  • at the bottom of the bottom  /i should know / DQ update / Holy Spirit showed up!  /a bird moment  /dolphinese  /trackin’  /all in the eyes  /pokered toons  /da vinci’s bid  /predicted   and/wrote afore .
  • First my anagram read, “Back up a moment, wild dolphins follow Divinity’s directions, I note deeper depth, proof takes time, homosapiens need a better codeword…both ask that by quiet truth, hold door.”

    The second anagram reads, “to homo-sapiens… Divinity oks orders,  back up…need time… note I’d follow wild dolphins who had better direction; that proof’s coded by truth; people ask…read that moment…be quiet.”   

    Enough of a post for now.

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    This entry was posted in anagrams, coincidence, synchronicity and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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